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The power of vocal inflection

We’d all like to think that what we say is important. When we stand up to give a presentation or if we’re talking with a friend or significant other, we hope that others are listening to what we’re saying.

But the what is not necessarily as important as the how.

How you deliver your words can matter just as much (or more!) than what you say. No matter how compelling your message, if you say it in an unenthusiastic or irritated way, others will pick up on your tone, rather than what you are saying.

Take the simple phrase “Dinner’s ready.”

Let’s say you get home from work and you decide to prepare a nice meal for yourself and your family. You cook up a couple dishes from scratch and time everything perfectly so that your entrée comes out of the oven at the same time that you’ve finished making your sides. You’re pleased as punch with how your meal turned out and you can’t wait to share it with your family.

At this point, you call out in a sing-song voice, “Dinner’s ready!”

No reply.

Your spouse, your children are upstairs doing who-knows-what. But you don’t feel like hunting them down, so you busy yourself with doing a few dishes while you wait for them to come down.

Five minutes.

Ten.

When you call for your family again, the cheeriness is out of your voice completely. It’s been replaced by a loud, curt, and semi-dangerous tone:

“DINNER IS READY.”

You’d better believe your family will come running this time!

The lesson here is that vocal inflection matters. It conveys how serious you are about something. It demonstrates your enthusiasm (or lack of). It has the power to energize a room or put everyone to sleep.

Next time you’re about to interact with someone or lead a team meeting, think about your tone of voice. Practice your speech in front of a mirror. In most cases, you’ll want to sound energized, but not over-the-top. Cheery, but authentic. The only exception is if you’re speaking about a serious issue that requires more gravity. Use common sense and let your tone match the message.

For more tips on how to be a compelling speaker, take a look at these blog posts:

https://uxlblog.com/2016/10/05/let-your-voice-be-heard/

https://uxlblog.com/2016/03/09/10-ways-to-have-a-better-conversation/

MARGARET SMITH IS A CAREER COACH, AUTHOR, INSIGHTS®DISCOVERY LICENSED PRACTITIONER, FOUNDER OF UXL, AND CO-FOUNDER OF THE TAG TEAM. SHE HOSTS WORKSHOPS FOR PEOPLE WHO NEED CAREER OR PERSONAL GUIDANCE. YOU CAN VISIT HER WEBSITE AT WWW.YOUEXCELNOW.COM

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On the surface, the words “boss” and “leader” sound pretty synonymous. What is the difference, anyway? I think that the image below does a great job of illustrating the main differences. Let’s break it down…

boss leader

  1. A Leader is in the trenches

Both leaders and bosses give instructions, but unlike a boss, a leader helps to carry out the actual work. She pulls her weight, alongside the rest of her team. A good leader inspires others by demonstrating that she is invested in whatever project the team is working on.

  1. A Leader understands the team

Since a leader is working alongside his team, he understands how everyone clicks and what strengths and weaknesses each team member possesses. This knowledge helps the leader assign appropriate tasks to individuals and helps him understand the specific work style of each person on the team. By showing a genuine interest in each team member and taking the time to get to know everyone, the leader can easily identify when people are either discontent or thriving.

On the flipside, great leaders open themselves up to others. They practice transparency and, since they have nothing to hide, they don’t mind others getting to know their true, authentic selves.

  1. A Leader has vision

Instead of being reactive, a leader is proactive. The leader has an intimate knowledge of the work that is being undertaken and can therefore point the team in the right direction. That isn’t to say that the leader should micromanage to ensure that a task or project is done in a certain way. Rather, she should offer guidance and allow the team to figure out the details on their own.

  1. A Leader motivates the team

Instead of reprimanding or belittling the team, a leader builds his team up. By offering encouragement and constructive critiques, a good leader will develop a team that is inspired, motivated, and productive.

  1. A Leader keeps moving

Great leaders are humble enough to realize that they don’t know everything. They aspire to keep growing and changing; they move forward and take their team with them. When a roadblock gets in their way, great leaders don’t throw in the towel or turn around. Instead, they strategize with their team on how to overcome the obstacle and continue moving forward (or in a new direction).

Do you feel like more of a boss or a leader? Take a few minutes to think about these five qualities of a great leader and consider how you can embrace your leadership.

Need more guidance? Reach out and contact me today.

MARGARET SMITH IS A CAREER COACH, AUTHOR, INSIGHTS®DISCOVERY LICENSED PRACTITIONER, FOUNDER OF UXL, AND CO-FOUNDER OF THE TAG TEAM. SHE HOSTS WORKSHOPS FOR PEOPLE WHO NEED CAREER OR PERSONAL GUIDANCE. YOU CAN VISIT HER WEBSITE AT WWW.YOUEXCELNOW.COM

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There are several components that make up an authentic leader. The model below shows some of the basic elements that are needed to create an excellent leader. It’s good to have a healthy amount of each of these qualities, although no one is perfect and one or two might slip from time to time. Study the model and ask yourself, “What am I doing well and what do I need to improve?” Make an action plan.

anatomy of an authentic leader

 

MARGARET SMITH IS A CAREER COACH, LICENSED INSIGHTS DISCOVERY PRACTITIONER, FOUNDER OF UXL, AND CO-FOUNDER OF THE TAG TEAM. YOU CAN VISIT HER WEBSITE AT WWW.YOUEXCELNOW.COM

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