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Tag Archives: Margaret Smith Minneapolis career coach

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Adapting is part of being human, so why is it so difficult? For many of us, change is not an easy thing to wrap our heads around, especially when it’s for something as important as a job. COVID-19 has certainly altered how we work–combining our homes with our workplaces–so it’s necessary to adapt along with it. As a result, the changes made right now could be in place for longer than we expect as we await a vaccine. 

In the meantime, here are 5 ways to effectively adapt to change:

Ask questions.

Digital meetings are just one example of a new widespread workplace innovation. These meetings can be hectic and confusing. When confused, the best way to figure things out is to speak up and ask questions. Asking questions shows that you’re really paying attention and that you want to do your best work. If your technology skills aren’t quite up to date, set up a meeting with your IT department to make sure your digital meetings run smoothly. 

Over-communicate.

Your employers may not know how your time is spent when you’re working from home. Communicating often with your boss and/or associates may seem like overkill, but it demonstrates your responsibility and that you’re getting work done. Keep close track of the hours you work and what you’re doing during that time to ensure you’re being accountable. 

Have ideas? Share them!

There will be a lot of uncertainty as we move forward in the midst of the pandemic. Some managers will look to employees for proposals on how to social distance when transitioning back to the workplace. Research is a crucial step to fully forming an idea. Taking initiative to research can go a long way because it saves your boss’ time. Sharing and researching ideas demonstrates that you’re invested in the company’s future AND shows you’re a leader. 

Keep in contact with co-workers.

Co-workers with similar jobs are going through the same thing you are. A great way to cope with change is to ask co-workers if they’d like to discuss what they’re going through. Associates can offer new suggestions, help you problem-solve, and provide new perspectives. Developing workplace friendships can also benefit you in the future by giving you access to new opportunities!

Be open-minded and flexible.

With everything uncertain, we can’t expect things to go back to the way they were immediately. Old tasks might take longer than they used to and can be frustrating. If you’re open-minded you can challenge your belief restraints and you can grow personally. Being flexible to new ideas also shows that you’re in it for the long haul. 

Just remember: “Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change.”  -Stephen Hawking

MARGARET SMITH IS A CAREER COACH, AUTHOR, INSIGHTS® DISCOVERY (AND DEEPER DISCOVERY) LICENSED PRACTITIONER, AND FOUNDER OF UXL. SHE HOSTS WORKSHOPS FOR PEOPLE WHO NEED CAREER OR PERSONAL GUIDANCE. 
NOW LIVE: CHECK OUT MARGARET’S ONLINE LEADERSHIP COURSE.

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Woman at desk

We have to turn a profit!

We need to grow and improve!

We have to serve our customers as best we can!

We have to improve our marketing and reach more people!

It’s easy to get wrapped up in big-picture company goals. These are the objectives that drive the day-to-day. They are provide direction for you and your team. However, they are NOT everything.

Even though company objectives are certainly worthy (your organization wouldn’t get very far without them), they don’t always consider the engine that’s driving change: the employees.

Those who work within the company walls, fill out paperwork, brainstorm, attend meetings…they are the ones who make the world go ‘round. They are the force behind any company movement. If you get right down to it, nothing can be accomplished without people power.

So…why do so many companies seem to put their people last?

I argue that employees—team members—should be prioritized. Instead of treating your people as an afterthought, start engaging with them. Find out what makes them tick, what motivates and excites them. Discover what new and out-of-the-box ideas they might have—ideas that could drive change and innovation.

On the flip side, it’s crucial to understand what does not work for your employees. What are their sticking points? What do they believe needs improvement? What is slowly down or impeding their performance?

As a leader, it’s your responsibility to make sure your team feels:

  • Listened to (keep an open line of communication, get to know them, and make sure all voices are heard)
  • Supported (with both people and resources)
  • Motivated
  • Worthy and Important to the overall company mission

People should not be afraid of approaching leadership with concerns or fresh ideas. They shouldn’t be scared of taking sensible risks. They also shouldn’t feel like their leadership is distant and unapproachable.

It’s time to start listening to and empowering employees. They are the backbone of your organization, and if they are motivated and working within a fully-supportive environment, they will thrive.

Want to talk more about improving relationships with and among your team members? I am an Insights Licensed Practitioner and have helped countless teams improve their communication and team dynamics. Let’s talk!


MARGARET SMITH IS A CAREER COACH, AUTHOR, INSIGHTS® DISCOVERY (AND DEEPER DISCOVERY) LICENSED PRACTITIONER, AND FOUNDER OF UXL. SHE HOSTS WORKSHOPS FOR PEOPLE WHO NEED CAREER OR PERSONAL GUIDANCE. 
NOW LIVE: CHECK OUT MARGARET’S ONLINE LEADERSHIP COURSE.

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woman on laptop in bed

When you’re stuck at home all day, with only your cat or a couple other people to keep you company, professional networking may sound like a strange term from a long-ago place!

Not so. Networking is just as (if not more) important than ever. If you’ve recently been furloughed or lost your job, it’s important. If you’re looking to transition to another career, it’s important. If you’re hoping to gain a promotion or move into a leadership position at your organization, it’s important.

What’s more, if you decide to put effort into networking now (when so many people are caught up in the COVID-19 pandemic and not focusing on their careers), you’ll gain an edge over your peers.

How can you approach virtual networking?

Cathy Paper, founder of RockPaperStar, is a professional coach and marketer. She suggests starting your networking with people you already know (those who are well-connected or influential) and expanding it from there. Ask for introductions, so you’re networking won’t be “cold,” but “warm.”

Cathy also suggests going into your networking with a plan. Think about how many people you would like to connect with each week, and aim for that. Also, consider your approach. Will you be emailing? Calling? Sending a LinkedIn message? Keep in mind that not everyone will respond, and plan accordingly.

When you send a message, it is useful to bring up what YOU offer, and not just what you want. Show that you’re useful and willing to help. Otherwise, your invitation to connect will appear to be self-serving. By approaching networking with a mentality of service, you will show that you’re just as interested in helping as being helped. Networking should never be a one-way street.

You may also want to show your creative side when networking. How can you help others remember you? How can you stand out? You don’t want to be tacky, but you do want to be unique. Come up with a catchy phrase that captures what you do, or direct your potential connect to a resource that might be useful for them.

Follow-up and stay connected! New connections aren’t useful if you let them slip through the cracks. Stay connected by sending out regular emails or adding them to your newsletter list (with their permission). You could also post articles on your blog and share them through social media, to A) stay top-of-mind and B) demonstrate that you have valuable information to share.

Virtual networking doesn’t have to be intimidating. Make a list of potential connections, ask for an introduction (if you have a connection), and send a thoughtful email or message that conveys who you are and what you do. And don’t forget to follow-up. In many ways, virtual networking is easier than face-to-face networking because you can sit behind your screen and think about what you’d like to say before you say it.

The real key: Just do it! Put yourself out there, take a risk, and start making connections today.


MARGARET SMITH IS A CAREER COACH, AUTHOR, INSIGHTS® DISCOVERY (AND DEEPER DISCOVERY) LICENSED PRACTITIONER, AND FOUNDER OF UXL. SHE HOSTS WORKSHOPS FOR PEOPLE WHO NEED CAREER OR PERSONAL GUIDANCE. 
NOW LIVE: CHECK OUT MARGARET’S ONLINE LEADERSHIP COURSE.

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