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Tag Archives: Interview Do’s

By Margaret Smith, UXL:
SPEAKER | CAREER COACH | CERTIFIED INSIGHTS DISCOVERY PRACTITIONER

As I mentioned in a previous post, older unemployed workers face a more of a challenge when searching for employment than other demographics.  I’ve compiled a list of some helpful reminders for the older worker’s job hunt that will help you to keep your best foot forward at all times.

> Never forget what you’re worth: Older workers are dependable, have advanced problem-solving abilities, and are just as productive as younger workers.
> Stay enthusiastic and excited: No matter what your age, if you come off as exhausted, bored, resentful, or frustrated, you’re giving interviewers a bad impression.
> Keep your exchange respectful, no matter your age difference.
> Highlight your creativity through specific examples of your past work.
> Emphasize your past loyalty to your company.
> Edit your resume: Avoid the “too old” impression by limiting your “related experience” to the past 15 years, excluding graduation dates, and paring down your list of employment experience by saying “5+ years” instead of “30 years”.
> Explain you’re prepared to hit the ground running. Share examples of your ability to learn quickly with the interviewer.
> Take advantage of your expansive network—it’s still the best way to find work.
> Keep all mentioned accomplishments current.
> Make sure your dress is up to date
, instead of dating you.
> Avoid feelings of defeat or apology for your age—this is not a topic that should be on the table during an interview, nor is it relevant to the conversation.
> Don’t limit your job search to exactly what you were doing before—consider a career change, why not?!
> Don’t mention upcoming retirement hopes.
> Stay current with new technology
. Take a class, solicit the help of another, and do your research.

If you’d like help relaying your skills, interviewing, and branding yourself during the job process, contact me today to learn how I can help.

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By Margaret Smith
SPEAKER | CAREER COACH | CERTIFIED INSIGHTS DISCOVERY PRACTITIONER

In one of my many back issues of Oprah Magazine I stumbled upon an article that had some tips for the job interview that I think will be very helpful for today’s job hunters.

Most of us are amateurs at making snap judgments; HR professionals do it for a living, and they’re tough! Susan Sommers explains that “a skirt suit is a good bet” and reminds readers that “navy is a softer neutral than black.”

However, corporate clones need not apply. “Be genuine—don’t dress like someone you’re not,” warns Susan Kim, Marketing Manager for a skincare company.

Another great way to boost your confidence and image is to make sure your grooming day-of is meticulous. To compliment this grooming, wear the best accessories you can afford.

5 Major Don’ts:

  1. Don’t wait until the last minute: Anxiety breeds mistakes.
  2. Don’t get a radical haircut or color job: Instead, opt for a trim or salon blow dry.
  3. Forget painful shoes: No matter how cute they are, don’t wear them if they bind, squeeze, droop, or bunch. You want to be as comfortable as possible.
  4. Avoid all black: Color has a persuasive, emotional power that should not be wasted.
  5. Don’t starve yourself beforehand: If the occasion does not include food, you may get lightheaded and really be embarrassed.

As for the men, I always tell my coachees to wear a suit and tie. You can always take the tie off, but it’s difficult to discreetly put a tie on at the last minute! Shoes should be comfortable for men as well, but keep them professional (black sneakers don’t count), and they should be polished.

Many times it’s the little things that make a big difference in those first 3 seconds when perceptions are critical. Invest the time in giving your look a little something that will set you apart in just the right, memorable way.

For more useful tips concerning the job hunt, cover letters, and your career, contact UXL today!

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