Skip to content

UXL Blog

Creating Successful Leaders

Over 40 and on the job hunt? Don’t despair! Here are some interview tips to help show off your relevancy and worth.

Advertisements

Colleagues Applauding Senior Businessman

Since we spent the last month talking about Millennials, I thought it was time to flip the coin and address a topic that exclusively effects those in the Baby Boomer generation. (I’m also gathering information about Boomers in the workplace, so if you’d like to participate in my survey, please do so!)

So, you’re 45, 55, or 65 years old and looking for work? Don’t let all the younger faces in the workforce intimidate you or make you feel unworthy of nailing your dream job (it’s never too late!). Instead, freshen up your strategy and approach the job hunt and interview process with optimism and vigor.

Below, I’ve compiled a list of some helpful reminders for the older worker’s job hunt that will help you keep your best foot forward at all times:

> Never forget what you’re worth: Older workers are dependable, have advanced problem-solving abilities, and are just as productive as younger workers

>Stay enthusiastic and excited: No matter what your age, if you come off as exhausted, bored, resentful, or frustrated, you’ll give interviewers a bad impression

> Keep your exchange respectful, no matter your age difference

> Offer examples of your work that demonstrate your creativity

> Emphasize your past loyalty to your company

> Edit your resume: Avoid the “too old” impression by limiting your relevant experience to the past 15 years, excluding graduation dates, and paring down your list of employment experience by saying “5+ years” instead of “30 years.\”

> Share examples of your ability to learn quickly

> Take advantage of your expansive network—it’s still the best way to find work

> Keep all mentioned accomplishments current

> Make sure your dress is up to date, instead of dating you

> Avoid feelings of defeat or apology for your age—this is not a topic that should be on the table during an interview, nor is it relevant to the conversation

> Don’t limit your job search to exactly what you were doing before—consider a career change, why not?

> Don’t mention upcoming retirement hopes

> Stay current with new technology

If you’d like help relaying your skills, interviewing, and branding yourself during the job process, contact me today to learn how I can help.

Tags: , , , ,

%d bloggers like this: